Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms

Dr. Joseph Childs practices in Chester County, Pennsylvania. I wanted you to see what he says about diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms and treatment. I have never had contact with Dr. Childs, but I believe in what he says in this video.

In this article and following articles we will explore most of the symptoms and treatments Dr. Childs says “flat out works.” For me personally, I can also say they “flat out worked.”

Learning about diabetes peripheral neuropathy symptoms is the first step in the road to recovery. It is like back engineering almost any problem. Identify the manifestation of the problem(s). Then look for the cause(s).

The general medical community tends to treat the symptoms, but a holistic approach is to understand the cause and try to eliminate it at the core. This is where I discovered neurological chiropractors, like Dr. Childs, appear to have an advantage over most, but not all, traditional physicians.

Board certified neurological chiropractors nearly always told me my painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy likely could be reversed if I was willing to make an all out long term commitment to making it happen. I was. I did.

Diabetis Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms

Symptoms vary according to the type of neuropathy. Some symptoms develop slowly. Others develop much faster.

The main types of diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms are:

  • Sensory Neuropathy – damage to the nerves that carry messages to the brain. This includes touch, temperature, pain and other sensations. Symptoms of sensory neuropathy are:
    • Feeling of pins and needles in the affected body part
    • numbness and reduced ability to feel pain and other sensations, particularly in the feet
    • a burning or sharp stabbing pain, often in the feet
    • feeling pain from things that should not be painful, such as very light touch
    • loss of balance or co-ordination. This is caused by reduced ability to tell the position of the feet or hands.
  • Motor Neuropathy – damage to the nerves that control our body’s movement. Symptoms of motor neuropathy are:
    • muscle weakness or paralysis in one or more muscles
    • twitching and cramps in the muscles
    • wasting – thinning of muscles
    • foot drop – difficulty lifting up the front part of your foot and toes, particularly noticeable when walking
  • Autonomic Neuropathy – damage to nerves that control involuntary
    bodily functions, such as digestion, bladder relief and sometimes control of
    blood pressure. Included symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are:

    • constipation or diarrhea, particularly at night
    • feeling sick, bloating and belching
    • low blood pressure, which can make you feel faint or dizzy when you stand up
    • rapid heartbeat (tachycardia)
    • excessive sweating or a lack of sweating
    • problems with sexual function, such as erectile dysfunction in men
    • difficulty emptying your bladder of urine
    • loss of bowel control
  • Mononeuropathy – damage to a single nerve that is located outside of the central nervous system. Symptoms of mononeuropathy may include:
    • weakness or altered sensation in the fingers
    • double vision – problems with focusing your eyes, sometimes including pain in the eye
    • Bell’s palsy – weakness and numbness on one side of the face
    • weakness, pain or altered sensation of the foot or shin

Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common type of mononeuropathy. The carpal tunnel is a tiny tunnel in your wrist. The median nerve becomes compressed where it passes through this tunnel. This often causes fingers to feel tingling, pain or numbness.

It is common to have multiple types of peripheral neuropathy at once. Sensory and motor neuropathy is particularly common. This is referred to as sensorimotor polyneuropathy.

When I began my journey to identify my own diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms I was surprised to discover I was affected by three of the four types.

You should now be able to identify all of your diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms and know which ones affect you. Next we are going to discover something that may shock you. Thanks to big pharma you may be taking medications which unknowingly can be partially causing your neuropathy and if not causing it, these medications could be restricting your body from repairing your nervous systems.

Small Fiber Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Small fiber peripheral neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy that occurs from damage to the small unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers.

Unmyelinated is a big medical word, but to make it simple think of wire that transmits electricity. Wire that is bare will transfer current, but is subject to many types of interference. Wire that is wrapped in insulation is more effective. The insulation protects the wire from unwanted problems.

Our nervous systems operate the same way. The insulation on the outside of our neurosystem wires is called myelin. So unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers is simply nerve fibers without protection. Damage as a result of unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers is called small fiber peripheral neuropathy.

Look at the image on the right. This demonstrates how an unmyelinated nerve fiber functions compared to a myelinated one.

Myelin is made by the body for this purpose. Now, here comes the shocker.

Cholesterol, is an essential lipid component of myelin, without which myelin fails to form.

In 2005 a group of neurologists published a study called:

High cholesterol level is essential for myelin membrane growth.

I also discovered this was not the only study done on the need for high cholesterol in order to grow myelin membrane.

Meanwhile, big pharma was touting the benefits of statins to get our cholesterol down as low as possible.

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms and Big Pharma

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms and Big PharmaSo . . . let me stop here. I am not a doctor. Nothing I say here is medical advice. I am only relating things I discovered in my journey to get my life back. I made a personal decision to stop taking statins.

I can not and do not suggest that anyone else do as I did.

I only encourage everyone with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy to start questioning everything you have been told and research for yourself.

Ask Questions

My own belief is that big pharma is influencing our valued medical professionals to do what is best for big pharma and not what is best for us.

Ask yourself “Does big pharma want me to get rid of diabetes and diabetic peripheral neuropathy? Does big pharma want me to stop taking statins?”

I believe the more you learn the sooner you will get your life back. Stay with me.  The road ahead gets really exciting.  I feel we need to focus more on healing the cause of our pain than suppressing our diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms.

12 Comments

  1. Excellent article. I suffer from this. Some days are worse, some are better.
    I always second guess my Doctors. I want to know what I’m taking and why.

    • Good for you. Big Pharma has been behind a lot of bad education in our medical community. (My opinion). Like you, I question everything.

  2. What a nice post you wrote! I really enjoyed reading it and I could not be silent about your post so I decided to leave my comment here and say Thank You! For sharing this quality post with others.
    Actually this is exactly the information that I was looking for information about Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms and when I landed on your website and read this post, it answered all my questions in details.
    So I’m happy that you decided to write about this topic and share it with people. It’s very useful and can definitely be used as a great source for everyone who is interested in this topic.
    I will come back to your website again for sure and I’m looking forward to reading your new posts.)

    Thanks!

    • Thank you, Ali. Your comment is appreciated. I am on a mission to Stop the Pain of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

  3. Love your post  love the fact that you are addressing  the issue of what big pharma wants and what is really good for our body. These kind of topics seem to be a taboo that no one wants to talk about when indeed we should all be opening our eyes and think again how we can take better care of our body. I will definitely share your post on my social media . Thank you 

    • Thank you, Barbara.  I would never have found a way to control my own pain without going broke if I had not discovered how Big Pharma was operating.  I appreciate your appreciation. 🙂

  4. Great information! I am glad there`s someone, like you, who openly talk about the monopoly in the pharmaceutical industry. You are right, we really do not know if these drugs we are prescribed with are really for treating our pain/concern we have.
    Thank you for sharing this.
    All the best!

    • Thank you, Hanna, I can only talk from personal experience as I am not a medical doctor, but we live in an era where we have access to the same resources as the medical community. Self doctoring has worked well for me. I still take some meds, but far less than I used to. When I go to my doctor I tell them what I need and why. I read my own blood tests and get confirmation from my doctor. It works well for both of us.

  5. As a back pain sufferer, I have neuropathy everywhere and in seemingly random places. The doc sees me every six months and does the same blood tests, including diabetes. I am on statins and didn’t know about the possible connection. Thanks for providing this information, along with the valuable research to back it up.

    • Thank you, Jerimy, for your comment. I still have diabetes, but now take only about 20% of the insulin I used to take. I have been off statins for more than two years. Healing of damaged nerves has taken time, but for me it gets better all the time. My doctor still looks at me with an “I think you are crazy.” look when she sees my cholesterol levels, but my doctor respects me for all my research. She now believes I am correct about most of it, but medical doctors have been so indoctrinated by Big Pharma about statins that they are slow to come around on that one issue. Also, I encourage you to see a board certified Neurological Chiropractor. That helped me a lot.

  6. Thank you, Jerimy, for your comment. I still have diabetes, but now take only about 20% of the insulin I used to take. I have been off statins for more than two years. Healing of damaged nerves has taken time, but for me it gets better all the time. My doctor still looks at me with an “I think you are crazy.” look when she sees my cholesterol levels, but my doctor respects me for all my research. She now believes I am correct about most of it, but medical doctors have been so indoctrinated by Big Pharma about statins that they are slow to come around on that one issue.

  7. One additional thought, Jerimy. I believe a good board certified neurological chiropractor could really help you since your problems are originating in the central nervous system. Best wishes for good outcomes.

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